Responsible Travel

Responsible tourism

At, Highland Expeditions, we are committed to Responsible tourism from the very heart of our business practice and philosophy. We make sure that all our trips are run responsibly without affecting environmental, social and cultural aspects. 

Plastic Pledge

The problem with plastics is apparent to most people and the mountains are also being affected by this. Globally, we produce 400 trillion tons of plastic, almost half of which is single-use, often discarded after less than 1 minute. Plastic do not biodegrade and they will last for centuries posing health risks for animals, humans, and ecosystems. We strongly discourage our clients from single-use plastics, commonly mineral water bottle on the trek and climb. We urge all our clients to carry a reusable water bottle and fill it with water for the drinking purpose. We are a proud supporter and member of TAP (Travellers Against Plastic), Plastic Pollution Coalition and we continue to work on eliminating the use of single-use plastics on all our trips. 

Animal Welfare

We recognize the well being of nonhuman animals. In 2018, we banned elephant rides on our jungle safari trips and we ensure animals, wild and domestic, are not exploited on any of our trips. We also avoid the use of animals on our trips as a means for transport as much as possible. We use human porters for the transport of gears in Everest, Annapurna, Manaslu, Rolwaling, Langtang, Makalu etc. wherever possible ensuring they are well paid, insured and equipped. If we are forced to use domestic animals (Yak, Dzopkyo, Donkey, Mules) due to the only means of transport available, we make sure they are not exploited. Only appropriate loads will be allowed to carry and we make sure they are well looked after. 

Child Welfare

All Children have the right to be protected from violence, exploitation, abuse and neglect. Yet, millions of children worldwide, including in Nepal, from all socio-economic backgrounds, across all ages, religions and cultures suffer violence, exploitation and abuse every day. We recommend you to take the following actions in order to help create a safer environment for children.

1. Do not give money to children begging but instead give them reading materials (Pencils, Drawing book, Pen, Books) which will over time change their behaviour.
2. If you wish to support kids, do not give money to them directly but support their families instead or donate to children charities.
3. If you see any child being exploited or are concerned about the welfare of any child, tell your guide. 
4. Always ask their permission before taking photos and treat them with respect and love. 
5. Educate the locals about the welfare of a child. 

Staff Welfare

The well being of our guides and porters is of utmost priority to us. We make sure to provide them with respectful and fair working conditions. The welfare of our trekking and climbing staff is of great importance to us. We strictly abide by the rules and regulations set by the Nepal government, Porter protection and etc.  All our staff are well insured and we ensure they are well paid and well equipped. We are a small team of guides working as a family to provide you with the authentic travel experience in our part of the world. 

Supporting Primary Schools 

We proudly support schools at remote locations of Nepal where there is no basic education for children. In many remote areas of Nepal, there is no proper education system due to many children are deprived of basic education.

We proudly support Rolwaling Sangag Choling Monastery School, located at Beding Village in Rolwaling region of Nepal. The school was founded by the head lama of Rolwaling region, addressing the problem by establishing a free school following a special philosophy which aims to provide a quality education covering general academia and life skills alongside traditional Buddhist education. 

If you wish to help by donating please feel free to get in touch with us. We guarantee that all of your donations will go directly towards the school.

Take only memories,
Leave only footprints. 

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